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ADNIV

Autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV) is an autoimmune disease of the eye without systemic features.

This eye-specific, inflammatory condition is characterized by the early presence of vitreous inflammation and loss of the ERG b-wave. The disease is progressive and complicated by pigmentary retinal degeneration, panuveitis, cystoid macular edema, retinal and iris neovascularization, epiretinal membrane formation, vitreous traction on the retina, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and blindness.

The eye is an immune privileged site where the local immunological mechanisms are poorly understood. We believe understanding the cause of ADNIV will provide tremendous insight into more common eye diseases including uveitis, diabetic retinopathy, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

We are conducting studies into the genetics, proteomics and surgical therapy of this complex disease.

 

Please contact us for a consultation or to learn how you can support our research program.

Projects

We are using proteomics to study the vitreous fluid from eyes with ADNIV.

News

Feb 25 2019 | Posted In: 20/20 Blog
Palo Alto, CA —The Mahajan Lab in Stanford University’s Department of Ophthalmology is one of four 2018 recipients of the Stanford Alliance for Innovative Medicines (AIM) Grant.
Feb 4 2019 | Posted In: 20/20 Blog
Palo Alto, CA — How can physicians and scientists make clinical trials faster, cheaper, and more likely to succeed? The answer may be proteomic analysis.
Dec 14 2018 | Posted In: 20/20 Blog
Palo Alto, CA — Why volunteer for a clinical trial? The rigorous process of turning a new therapy into the standard of care depends on patient volunteers. 
Oct 27 2018 | Posted In: 20/20 Blog
Chicago, IL —Angela Li, a second year Stanford medical student working in the Mahajan lab, presented a poster, “Proteomic Analysis of Autosomal Dominant Neovascular Inflammatory Vitreoretinopathy,” at the 2018 American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) m
Jul 31 2018 | Posted In: 20/20 Blog
Park City, UT — Every summer for the past sixty-one years, the American Eye Study Club (AESC) has brought together ophthalmologists from across the country to share their expertise.

Publications

A novel de novo CAPN5 mutation in a patient with inflammatory vitreoretinopathy, hearing loss, and developmental delay, Velez, Gabriel, Bassuk Alexander G., Schaefer Kellie A., Brooks Brian, Gakhar Lokesh, Mahajan Maryann, Kahn Philip, Tsang Stephen H., Ferguson Polly J., and Mahajan Vinit B. , Molecular Case Studies, p.mcs–a002519, (2018)
Therapeutic drug repositioning using personalized proteomics of liquid biopsies, Velez, Gabriel, Bassuk Alexander G., Colgan Diana, Tsang Stephen H., and Mahajan Vinit B. , JCI insight, Volume 2, (2017)
Calpain-5 gene expression in the mouse eye and brain, Schaefer, Kellie, Mahajan Maryann, Gore Anuradha, Tsang Stephen H., Bassuk Alexander G., and Mahajan Vinit B. , BMC research notes, Volume 10, Number 1, p.602, (2017)
Functional validation of a human CAPN5 exome variant by lentiviral transduction into mouse retina., Wert, Katherine J., Skeie Jessica M., Bassuk Alexander G., Olivier Alicia K., Tsang Stephen H., and Mahajan Vinit B. , Hum Mol Genet, 2014 Jan 12, (2014)
Lymphocyte infiltration in CAPN5 autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy., Mahajan, Vinit B., and Lin Jonathan H. , Clin Ophthalmol, 2013, Volume 7, p.1339-45, (2013)
Monozygotic twins with CAPN5 autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy., Rowell, Hannah A., Bassuk Alexander G., and Mahajan Vinit B. , Clin Ophthalmol, 2012, Volume 6, p.2037-44, (2012)